Wednesday 10 February 2021

GENUINE SET DECORATION - DIANE HUNTER'S PAINTING








WINTER PLOUGH

The item we’re looking at today is a genuine prop from the set of Crossroads.  It’s not a “famous” prop – like the red sign, Meg’s lamp or her sitting room painting but it is certainly striking…

This is a (print of a) painting that used to hang in Diane Hunter’s flat in the early to mid 1980’s.

The owners of it recently made contact with the fan-club to find out if there would be anyone who would be interested in taking it off their hands as they have plans to emigrate and  no longer have space for it.

Would anyone be interested in it? Well of course I would!  I got in touch with them and agreed to become the guardian of this little bit of TV history…

So how did they get hold of the picture originally?

During a series of email conversations, the owners of the print told me that in the mid 1980’s they were friendly with the old lady that lived next door to  them, who was particularly taken with it whenever it appeared on screen. 

After writing several letters to Central Television, they finally managed to get hold of the picture in late 1986 (after Diane had moved house) and had presented it to the old lady as a gift. Although she was not particularly well, It apparently brought her a great deal of joy for the rest of her life.

When the neighbour died, she wanted the couple to have it back and they had kept hold of it ever since.

The print is actually a scene by an artist called David Shepherd. It is called “Winter Plough” and you can find out more about it https://www.davidshepherd.com/davidshepherd-winterplough.html

Alongside the print were letters from Central TV from 1985 and 1986, which detail exactly how the painting came into the hands of the people that got in touch with the fan-club. 

Letter 1

Letter 3


As you can see by reading the letters it was an item from stock and even Central admitted by the time they let the picture go, it was looking a little tatty…

Does it matter that it’s a bit rough around the edges? Of course not. It’s Diane Hunter’s picture!